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Sigvaldi Friðarsonur
Nibiru Kills
Nibiru Kills
Sigvaldi Friðarsonur
Nibiru Kills

An ancient Sumerian myth is reprised and explored in Sigvaldi Friðarsonur’s Nibiru Kills. The story tell of a planet which orbits our Sun every 3,600 years also makes destructive contact with the Earth. When the collision happens much of Earth is destroyed and so is a mass of the population and flora and fauna.

Friðarsonur considers himself as “an engineer with an arty output” and this approach is clear in his practice

“Everything gets scrutinised from two points of view. Can it be made? How can it look different? Because without being makeable…you can’t make it no matter how hard you try. And without being different… it will look the same as every other piece of grey, nondescript trash. Sometimes the starting point seems rational but then develops into something emotional. And if you are lucky it will satisfy all the emotive needs too. And if you are super lucky it will reach the summit of all three. That’s what I aim for”.

Raised in Africa, and trained as an engineer, Friðarsonur speaks English and Portuguese and has worked at London advertising agencies as a Creative Director. As a landscape photographer he has exhibited in London, Johannesburg, Lisbon and Iceland. He’s published over 20 books about photography, Haiku poetry, children’s stories and Icelandic architecture.

Image of artwork by Sigvaldi Friðarsonur
Nibiru Kills
32 pp book, 2019
Nibiru Kills
Nibiru Kills
Nibiru Kills
Nibiru Kills
Nibiru Kills
Nibiru Kills
Image of artwork by Sigvaldi Friðarsonur
Golden Dragon
Aluminium, plaster of Paris, gold leaf, January 2020, 1m wide
Image of artwork by Sigvaldi Friðarsonur
Shape 1
Aluminium, plaster of Paris, July 2019, 2m wide
Image of artwork by Sigvaldi Friðarsonur
Shape 2
Aluminium, plaster of Paris, July 2019, 1.7m wide